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By Cathy Pilkington on

Create your own science museum in Animal Crossing

If you play Animal Crossing: New Horizons, you can now add objects from the Science Museum Group to the game! Read on to find out how.

Animal Crossing: New Horizons is the very wholesome simulator game that lets you create your dream island, make friends with some adorable animals, curate a natural history museum collection and more.

Nintendo recently brought the art gallery back to the museum, but we think they are still missing a science museum.

Animal Crossing museum screenshot

Luckily for us, Getty have created an Animal Crossing Art Generator, which uses IIIF to turn images into patterns that can be used as wallpaper, flooring, clothing or pictures. To make things even easier, a new feature has been added to the Science Museum Group Collection Online that adds objects straight into the Art Generator, meaning you can have any object from that site on display in your museum.

Animal Crossing museum screenshot

With the help of our friends across the Science Museum Group, we’ve created some designs to get you started.

To import the designs into the game, just follow these steps:

  • Download the Nintendo Switch App and set up NookLink to connect your smartphone to your Animal Crossing game on your Nintendo Switch
  • Scan your QR code (see below) using the Nintendo Switch App
  • In Animal Crossing, use your NookPhone to download designs into your custom designs app

Phenakistoscope Disc

Phenakistoscope disc QR code

The phenakistoscope was an early animation device that was used to create the illusion of movement. The discs were placed facing a mirror; the viewer would spin the disc and view the reflection through slits. This created the effect of movement on the images. An example of a phenakistoscope is on display alongside other early optical toys in the Animation Gallery at the National Science and Media Museum.

Read more about Phenakistoscope Disc

Stookie Bill

Stookie Bill QR code

Television pioneer John Logie Baird used this ventriloquist’s dummy, known as Stookie Bill, to test his experimental television work. He had to use a puppet instead of a person as the lights/machine were too hot.

Read more about Stookie Bill

The Four Steamliners

Train poster QR code

Chosen by the National Railway Museum, this coloured lithograph poster was used by the London and North Eastern Railway (L.N.E.R.) in the late 1930s. It shows four A4 class locomotives and the routes they travelled.

Read more about The Four Steamliners

Deltic

Deltic QR code

Designed to take over from steam powered trains such as Flying Scotsman, the English Electric Company’s diesel Deltic dominated the East Coast expresses for over a decade. Deltic can be found at Locomotion in Shildon.

Read more about Deltic

Textile Trade Ticket

Ticket QR code

The Science and Industry Museum in Manchester has a wonderful collection of shipper’s tickets and textile trade tickets. The tiger comes from a sample book that includes tickets from Behrens, Bloom, Ralli Brothers, Baxendale, Jaffe, with an index of company names, c.1880s–1920s.

Read more about Textile Trade Tickets

Sokol Space Suit

Space suit QR code

This space suit belonged to British astronaut Helen Sharman. It was worn on the Juno mission to the Mir space station. The real suit is on display at the Science Museum in London.

Read more about Sokol Space Suit

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